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  • The idea of “Freedom of Conscience,” the freedom of individuals to hold thoughts and beliefs independent of the coercion of others, exists as a cornerstone in the foundations of the history of the United States. So many modern events and issues regarding the First Amendment, state vs. federal power, freedom of religion, the Bill of Rights, human rights, and more all relate to this simple, yet powerful ideal.

    To support education in freedom of conscience principles, we work to support the development of related in-class educational experiences for U.S. History, Government, Religion, and other courses at the high-school level. In addition, we are launching the first annual Freedom Classroom in Washington D.C. for one-week during the summer of 2012. Twelve high school students in the United States will be selected to participate in this experience, selected from applicants in a Freedom Classroom Essay Competition.

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Now Accepting Competition Entries

The Freedom Classroom team is excited to start receiving entries. A select group of winners will be invited to participate in the second annual “Freedom Classroom” experience in Washington D.C. this summer. To learn more about the competition and access the entry form, visit http://freedomclassroom.wordpress.com/essay-competition/. To learn more about the experience in Washington D.C. visit … Continue reading

Freedom Classroom: A Message from Norm Farley

The Economist magazine dated November 5-11th published an article entitled “America’s Missing Middle”.  It featured an artist’s rendition of a hamburger bun sliced in the middle and separated but with nothing in the middle. We used to ask “where’s the beef?” The article made it very plain that the beef in America is missing.  In other … Continue reading

Recommended Subjects

In addition to the lesson plan resources on our site, we have created a collection of subjects and thoughts relevant to the Freedom Classroom experience in Washington D.C. FOR GOVERNMENT-HISTORY CLASSES The first leg of the trip to Washington will be spent in Harpers Ferry, Antietam, and Historic Colonial Williamsburg. Harpers Ferry was the philosophical … Continue reading